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Pinterest Explained: 5 Step Guide

Hi. My name is Mia. And I am a Pinterest-aholic. (I mean no disrespect to the 12 step communities here. Just my attempt at a laugh or smile or community around a shared vice. Anyway…)

I find myself talking about Pinterest more and more these days. It’s seeping into my spare time, my party planning, visioning, projects, reference items, wish lists and casual conversation.

Several months back, I declared on Facebook, in one of the only status updates I’ve offered since having a baby, “Dear Facebook, I am cheating on you with Pinterest“. It was met with “lols” and “likes” for those in the know (read: fellow addicts) and lots of questions and even hurt from Pinterest virgins (read: not in the know). And it was true. I nearly never logged in to Facebook anymore, which used to be a constant fixture on my quick links or one of my Perma Tabs (back in my Firefox days) and instead now spend almost all my social media time on Pinterest.

So, to the point at hand, I thought I would share a few quick things to explain this tool I have fallen head over heals in love with and often can’t pull myself away from. Here goes…

What is Pinterest?

  • Its another social media tool, like Facebook or twitter
  • Its a visual wonderland
  • Its a really simple tool
  • Its a place to capture images (This is called “pinning”-more on that later)
  • Its also a place to capture video (although not used as often)
  • Its a place to organize what you capture onto customizable boards, topic specific (when you create an account, there are a few pre-set options to get you started)
  • Its a place to interact (hence, the social in social media)
Pinner

The language of Pinterest

  • Pin or pinning: capturing and saving images
  • Repin: pinning someone else’s pin to your own board
  • Pinner: (Rhymes with Sinner) A member of the Pinterest community, one who actively pins
  • Board: a topic specific placeholder for you to collect, again topic specific images

What is “Pinning” exactly?

Think of it in the physical world. Imagine reading a magazine and seeing the perfect dining room table for your new house. You want to save this picture so that you can start finding paint colors, chairs, chandelier, a centerpeice and all the other needed items to decorate your dining room. So, you tear or cut that picture out of the magazine. You decide to start collecting ideas into a folder where you put this picture and any other ideas to help you design and decorate this room. This folder or holding place in Pinterest is called a “board” and you can name it whatever you want. In this case, “Dining Room” might be a good name for your board.

Here is one of my current projects, “Sofie’s Room”, that I have created a board for and am gathering ideas. I am planning out Sofie’s room redesign, now that she is moving into toddlerhood. Feel free to repin something that might help your own project, “like” or comment on any of the items I have pinned.

Pinterest App on the iPhone

How do I pin?

  1. You can download the site’s browser bookmarklet, a button that says “Pin It” onto your bookmark bar
  2. You can upload images from your iPhone on the Pinterest iPhone app
  3. You can upload images directly on the Pinterest.com website with the Add+ button in the toolbar on the top right of the site

Where do I get these images to “pin”?

  • From other Pinners on Pinterest.com (This is where I spend a lot of my Pinterest time…directly on the site, binging on others pins.)
  • From anywhere on the internet, vendors where you shop (e.g. Target), blogs you read, periodicals (e.g. NYT.com)
  • From photos that you take (often a great way to use the iPhone app)
So, wait, how does it work exactly ? Here’s a 5 Step Guide, Step by Step…
Step 1: Let’s say you are on favorite site, say Annie’s Eats (yummy blog)
Step 2: You come across a great recipe on homemade bagels and you think, “I want to make those bagels!” But, not right this minute. I need to hold on to that recipe.
Step 3: Aha! You are now a savvy pinner and decide to use your new favorite social media to hold on to that little recipe. And you’ve already downloaded the bookmarklet onto your Bookmark Toolbar, so you hit “Pin It” and this shows up-all the images on the current page for you to choose from:
Step 4: Then, you select the image you want and hit the “Pin This” button over the image. The second image looks the most decadent and will be a great visual reminder of the yummy bagels I want to make from this awesome recipe, compliments of Annie’s Eats.
Step 5: Then you get a screen pops up that asks you which board you want to pin this image to with a drop down menu (first picture below), then you have the option to add a description (second picture below). I would suggest adding something here that helps you remember what this pin is, exactly. For example “a recipe” or a DIY guide or tutorial. This way you will know if its just a picture of something you made vs. a recipe to help you make something in the future. Once you have added a description, you hit “Pin it”. Lastly, you get the option to “See your Pin” on your board, Tweet it or share on Facebook (third picture below). Or you can just close this box and get back to internet surfing or pinning.
Waalaaa! You are now a successful Pinner!
What makes it social in the social media world?
  • You can repin, comment and “like” other pins from other pinners
  • You can follow any other pinner-either all their boards or select any of their boards to follow
  • Other pinners are able to follow your boards
  • You can collaborate with other pinners on the same board (Planning a bridal shower? You and your fellow ladies in waiting can share a board and each add inspirations, ideas, details of the food, decorations, invitations, you name it.) To be more clear, collaborating on a board means that all parties or pinners can pin images to the same board.
A few tips and points of ettiquette…
  • You can add videos…not often used, but also a great option for your pinning pleasures
  • If you add an item onto a wish list board for example, you can add the amount is costs using a $ sign (for us US currency folks) and it will appear on the image in a banner on the left of the image. Great for a budget bound project, like a birthday party or to capture items I want for my birthday…ahemmm, hubby, if you are reading, this is hint-worthy information, an Easter egg (in Lost language) for you to make your gift giving easier for said wife
  • Use a 5 to 1 ratio…for every 5 repins, pin 1 novel image. This keeps things interesting or pinteresting, as the case may be. (Chuckle, snort, chuckle.)

And lastly, here are a bunch of great articles that my brilliant and way more in the know husband has sent me about Pinterest. He has not created an account for himself yet, but in the language of Strengths, a few of his top strengths are Learner, Input and Context…AND he is a GTD guru, so when it comes to all things social media, education, business, or just plain brilliant,  he is my supplier (read this with a Chicagoan, Italian mob gangster accent replacing the -ier with an- a. It makes it way more fun!) When he saw how excited I was at my new social media obsession, he started researching. So, I will share some of them with you here:

Check out my Pinterest page and see all my boards!

This is my first tutorial, how did I do? If you are new to Pinterest, did this help? If you are familiar with Pinterest, was this informative and hit the basics?

Thanks for reading and happy pinning!

Discussion

3 Responses to “Pinterest Explained: 5 Step Guide”

  1. Uh oh, what have I done! You finally inspired me to get over the hump and join Pinterest. Thanks for the inspiration!

    Posted by Brian J. Elizardi | 04. Apr, 2012, 3:12 pm

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

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